I have had several abdominal scans over recent years, and only last month was I diagnosed with Polycystic Ovaries. For as long as I can remember, I have suffered with ovulation pain. My cycle has always been irregular, so it wasn’t until we were trying to get pregnant that I realised the pain was happening when ovulation was taking place.

Under The Weather

If you read my blog regularly, you’ll probably already know I have been pretty poorly this past year. I have been backwards and forwards to the doctors and the hospital for every test imaginable, and then more besides. I won’t go into each and every symptom – you can read the back story here if you haven’t already.

diagnosed with Polycystic Ovaries

Alongside my other symptoms, I have had ever increasing bouts of crippling pelvic pain. It comes out of nowhere, and renders me useless for hours on end. I went to the doctors about this and her initial concern was that I had a kidney infection. After this was ruled out, she suggested it could be an STI. When you’ve been married for 8 years, and someone suggests this, it’s a big shock, let me tell you!

What Happened Next?

The GP did a swab to see which (if any) STI I had. I knew this was none, as they’d done those tests before I was sterilised in 2015, so unless hubby had been playing away, it was impossible. It didn’t stop me feeling horrific at the possibility for a week though. Once the results came back clear, the GP sent me for an ultrasound.

The person doing the scan said that to be diagnosed with Polycystic Ovaries, you need to have 12 or more cysts on an ovary. I had over 30 on one side and over 15 on the other. Some of them much larger than others. He said I’d be diagnosed and to see my GP in a couple of weeks.

diagnosed with Polycystic Ovaries

Diagnosed with Polycystic Ovaries

My GP told me 2 weeks later that I had been diagnosed with Polycystic Ovaries. She said that while it explained my irregular cycles, it didn’t explain the extreme pain. She referred me to a Gynaecologist at that point, and I saw him last week. The Gynaecologist said that the pain I am experiencing sounds like the cysts bursting. The only ways to stop it are to remove my ovaries or to give me the mini pill, which will stop me ovulating.

I was sterilised back in 2015, so I don’t need to worry about getting pregnant. There’s a lot of other health issues I have to contend with though, so I’m not sure how I feel about taking the mini pill. I have suffered with depression for years, and the traditional pill definitely made it much worse. I also have a blood clotting disorder so anything with risks of DVT is a big no no. My mum has brittle bones, so I have to be aware of that as well. Finally, I am overweight and have an under active thyroid, not to mention the other as of yet undiagnosed issues.

Now what?

diagnosed with Polycystic Ovaries

I have picked the prescription up, and my plan is to do some research into its side effects and then make an informed decision as to whether or not to take them. The pain is a big issue, but I can manage it for the most part. I’d hate to cause something else to get worse by taking the mini pill.

I’ve heard good things about following specific diets and taking specific supplements. I definitely need to read more about those too. I took part in a Q & A with Nature’s Best, discussing my Polycystic ovaries. You’ll be able to read my answers on their website soon.

Have you got PCOS? Do let me know in the comments if you’ve taken the mini pill and if it’s helped to control your symptoms.

This is a collaborative post with Natures Best.

2 thoughts on “I’ve been diagnosed with Polycystic Ovaries

  1. I have it too! I don’t get the severe pain like you do though, just pinching sensations once in a while if they get big enough, then when the pain goes away I know they’ve burst. I found out about it after I had my only child. I had a miscarriage a little while after with my second pregnancy , and we never were able to conceive again. So the one I do have is a blessing! Now I have to keep reminding myself to keep my weight in check since having pcos increases the likelihood of diabetes. I am thankful I don’t have extreme symptoms like some do. Best of luck if you decide to try the pill, it’s something I haven’t heard of.

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